FREE Shipping on All Orders $35+ | 20% Off Electric Sharpeners

A CLOSER LOOK...

WATCH AND LEARN MORE ABOUT WHAT OUR PRODUCTS CAN DO FOR YOU!

 

How to Protect Small Businesses From Burnout

Don't subject yourself to extra stress at the office! Learn and practice these techniques to protect you and your small business from work burnout.

July 2, 2018 | By Bostitch

 

Reducing the Operating Cost of Your Small Business

Starting a business can be costly. Find out how to save more while running your small business!

June 21, 2018 | By Bostitch

 

The Right Leadership Style for Common Workplace Challenges

Learn about the leadership styles that fit your office employees!

June 14, 2018 | By Bostitch

View all From the Blog

A Legacy Brand

  • Bostitch History
    1896

    Thomas Briggs invented a revolutionary way to bind books together with wire using what later became known as the wire stitcher. Shortly after he founded the Boston Wire Stitcher Company.

  • Bostitch History
    1903

    The first foot-operated Boston Wire Stitchers were produced. Efficient and unique in design, they were an immediate success.

  • Bostitch History
    1904

    Production moved to East Greenwich, Rhode Island and employing 80 workers.

  • Bostitch History
    1906

    The Bostitch Model A Staple Binder was developed. It used the first preformed staples on tin cores, which were held together by paper wrapping.

  • Bostitch History
    1914

    The first ever portable stapler, the Bostitch Model AO was produced. Its compact design and simplified loading allowed for widespread use.

  • Bostitch History
    1917

    During World War I, Bostitch was tasked by the US War Department to develop a new machine gun cartridge belt and loading system to improve productivity in ordinance factories.

  • Bostitch History
    1923

    Featuring an inexpensive stamped steel construction, the Bostitch Model B-1 Desk Stapler was the first to use a coiled pusher spring.

  • Bostitch History
    1924

    Bostitch introduced the first strip of easy-to-load "cemented" staples, which became the "standard staple" still used today.

View Full History